5 Dec 2022 | Blog

Prepare for Project Success – Why Quality Management Matters

Poor decisions made using ‘bad data’ cost the construction industry £1.3 trillion globally in 2020,

These bytes of data that are at the root of this expensive problem, run up rework bills of £63million alone, according to the same report

These staggering numbers scream that more emphasis needs to be focused on collecting and surfacing accurate data and efficient data handling at all stages of the building project.

A sector-specific Quality Management tool that weeds out these expensive errors could generate mammoth cost savings and increase data efficiency across the board for housebuilders, developers and other construction professionals – which would make a positive impact on yearly targets for any housebuilder or developer.

 

What’s the issue?

Bad data, as the FMI report spells out, is bleeding profits for all construction companies, despite the industry converting to more digital methods to manage and understand it.

The report, a survey of 1,115 construction professionals, tells us that there isn’t a specific part of building projects that needs rewriting. Across the board, the data being obtained is either unclear or unusable. At worst, professionals remain unclear about exactly what type of data that needs to be obtained, and how it should be stored and managed. For building regulations like Part L, where digital data is mandatory to ensure compliance, lacking or bad data would lead to the inevitable delay of a project completion if costly and invasive reworks were required to obtain it.

The FMI report states:

  • 82% of professionals are collecting more data from construction technology today than three years ago, but 39% say that less than half of that data is usable
  • 40% of the average organisation’s data is bad – meaning inaccurate, incomplete, inconsistent or untimely information
  • Professionals report problems with the whole process, from knowing what data to collect (51%) to understanding how to manage project data effectively (52%)

With such widespread problems, clarity must be a priority when dealing with project data.

What is needed?

When is it needed by?

Who is collecting the data?

Where does the data go and where is it stored?

Why is this data being collected?

And how can the data be easily shared with key stakeholders and collaborated on?

By answering these questions, those in the construction sector can make better decisions to build better, avoiding costly rework and easily complying with mandatory regulations like Part L, and the Building Safety Act. And by integrating the RIGHT solution, these questions will be answered, as a tool built for these demands will be pre-configured to prioritise and standardise structured data.

Which also means that mandatory requirements in regulations such as Part L will no longer be an obstacle. Instead, it will simply be another milestone in a project.

 

Comply with Quality Management

Part L, as an example, demands that SAP assessors have evidence and data presented promptly, so EPCs (Energy Performance Certificates) and the BREL Report (Building Regulation England Part L Report) can be released.  The as-built BREL Report must be completed and presented to the SAP assessor prior to the EPC being produced. An on-site audit of building details and thermal elements will be required during construction and at completion for building regulation approval, including photographic evidence to confirm all new builds and refurbished dwellings are constructed correctly using materials and technology that ensure energy savings and meets building regulation standards.

A centralised platform that collates, standardises, stores and shares all documentation and data, would make Part L a simpler part of the building project process, as opposed to a major obstacle.

Even though construction professionals are collecting more data digitally than ever before, there are plenty that are using the wrong tools for the job. Ambiguous software and platforms that don’t standardise or structure data and don’t offer the required level of quality management mean that any data can slip through the net. Some projects are using a multitude of solutions that synchronise, rendering data and documentation unclear, in silos and even worse – incorrect.

Massive delays can be a symptom of bad data quality management.

 

Get the data seal of approval with the right Quality Management

A clear process, outlined from the beginning and with all stakeholders involved with data acquisition, is key to ensuring any data that is collected, is valuable and understandable.

Templates and guidelines that highlight common standardisations to ensure the right data is gathered, direct where the data should be stored and make the data transparent with a user-friendly experience, accessibility and labelling of data, would help teams align and increase efficiency. Is there a better way to focus your team’s efforts on productive activity, increase efficiency and work toward a swift and satisfactory conclusion, than with a platform where everyone has the data they need at all times and know what they need to do with it?

Erroneous and badly aligned data slow down progress and can make regulatory compliance – something your project depends on – a slog, rather than simply another well-signposted milestone in your process.

A Quality Management solution gives you and your team the templates, workflows and dashboards to capture, mark-up, trace and share all photographic evidence and present it for assessors. It avoids confusion on what data to collect and helps every stakeholder know what needs to be done at every stage. You’re missing photographic evidence for a plot or there is documentation missing? An intuitive and clear dashboard that tracks Part L evidence progress fits the bill and dispels any confusion.

If you want your data to be correct and your project to have that assurance of Quality Management?

Then choose the right tool for the job.

Learn more about our Quality Management Solutions

 

22 Nov 2022 | Blog

The importance of digitising data to support cladding remediation and facilitate safer housing

Poor decisions made using ‘bad data’ cost the construction industry £1.3 trillion globally in 2020,

These bytes of data that are at the root of this expensive problem, run up rework bills of £63million alone, according to the same report

These staggering numbers scream that more emphasis needs to be focused on collecting and surfacing accurate data and efficient data handling at all stages of the building project.

A sector-specific Quality Management tool that weeds out these expensive errors could generate mammoth cost savings and increase data efficiency across the board for housebuilders, developers and other construction professionals – which would make a positive impact on yearly targets for any housebuilder or developer.

 

What’s the issue?

Bad data, as the FMI report spells out, is bleeding profits for all construction companies, despite the industry converting to more digital methods to manage and understand it.

The report, a survey of 1,115 construction professionals, tells us that there isn’t a specific part of building projects that needs rewriting. Across the board, the data being obtained is either unclear or unusable. At worst, professionals remain unclear about exactly what type of data that needs to be obtained, and how it should be stored and managed. For building regulations like Part L, where digital data is mandatory to ensure compliance, lacking or bad data would lead to the inevitable delay of a project completion if costly and invasive reworks were required to obtain it.

The FMI report states:

  • 82% of professionals are collecting more data from construction technology today than three years ago, but 39% say that less than half of that data is usable
  • 40% of the average organisation’s data is bad – meaning inaccurate, incomplete, inconsistent or untimely information
  • Professionals report problems with the whole process, from knowing what data to collect (51%) to understanding how to manage project data effectively (52%)

With such widespread problems, clarity must be a priority when dealing with project data.

What is needed?

When is it needed by?

Who is collecting the data?

Where does the data go and where is it stored?

Why is this data being collected?

And how can the data be easily shared with key stakeholders and collaborated on?

By answering these questions, those in the construction sector can make better decisions to build better, avoiding costly rework and easily complying with mandatory regulations like Part L, and the Building Safety Act. And by integrating the RIGHT solution, these questions will be answered, as a tool built for these demands will be pre-configured to prioritise and standardise structured data.

Which also means that mandatory requirements in regulations such as Part L will no longer be an obstacle. Instead, it will simply be another milestone in a project.

 

Comply with Quality Management

Part L, as an example, demands that SAP assessors have evidence and data presented promptly, so EPCs (Energy Performance Certificates) and the BREL Report (Building Regulation England Part L Report) can be released.  The as-built BREL Report must be completed and presented to the SAP assessor prior to the EPC being produced. An on-site audit of building details and thermal elements will be required during construction and at completion for building regulation approval, including photographic evidence to confirm all new builds and refurbished dwellings are constructed correctly using materials and technology that ensure energy savings and meets building regulation standards.

A centralised platform that collates, standardises, stores and shares all documentation and data, would make Part L a simpler part of the building project process, as opposed to a major obstacle.

Even though construction professionals are collecting more data digitally than ever before, there are plenty that are using the wrong tools for the job. Ambiguous software and platforms that don’t standardise or structure data and don’t offer the required level of quality management mean that any data can slip through the net. Some projects are using a multitude of solutions that synchronise, rendering data and documentation unclear, in silos and even worse – incorrect.

Massive delays can be a symptom of bad data quality management.

 

Get the data seal of approval with the right Quality Management

A clear process, outlined from the beginning and with all stakeholders involved with data acquisition, is key to ensuring any data that is collected, is valuable and understandable.

Templates and guidelines that highlight common standardisations to ensure the right data is gathered, direct where the data should be stored and make the data transparent with a user-friendly experience, accessibility and labelling of data, would help teams align and increase efficiency. Is there a better way to focus your team’s efforts on productive activity, increase efficiency and work toward a swift and satisfactory conclusion, than with a platform where everyone has the data they need at all times and know what they need to do with it?

Erroneous and badly aligned data slow down progress and can make regulatory compliance – something your project depends on – a slog, rather than simply another well-signposted milestone in your process.

A Quality Management solution gives you and your team the templates, workflows and dashboards to capture, mark-up, trace and share all photographic evidence and present it for assessors. It avoids confusion on what data to collect and helps every stakeholder know what needs to be done at every stage. You’re missing photographic evidence for a plot or there is documentation missing? An intuitive and clear dashboard that tracks Part L evidence progress fits the bill and dispels any confusion.

If you want your data to be correct and your project to have that assurance of Quality Management?

Then choose the right tool for the job.

Learn more about our Quality Management Solutions

 

10 Nov 2022 | Blog

Making Part L compliance easier – Answering your software platform questions

Poor decisions made using ‘bad data’ cost the construction industry £1.3 trillion globally in 2020,

These bytes of data that are at the root of this expensive problem, run up rework bills of £63million alone, according to the same report

These staggering numbers scream that more emphasis needs to be focused on collecting and surfacing accurate data and efficient data handling at all stages of the building project.

A sector-specific Quality Management tool that weeds out these expensive errors could generate mammoth cost savings and increase data efficiency across the board for housebuilders, developers and other construction professionals – which would make a positive impact on yearly targets for any housebuilder or developer.

 

What’s the issue?

Bad data, as the FMI report spells out, is bleeding profits for all construction companies, despite the industry converting to more digital methods to manage and understand it.

The report, a survey of 1,115 construction professionals, tells us that there isn’t a specific part of building projects that needs rewriting. Across the board, the data being obtained is either unclear or unusable. At worst, professionals remain unclear about exactly what type of data that needs to be obtained, and how it should be stored and managed. For building regulations like Part L, where digital data is mandatory to ensure compliance, lacking or bad data would lead to the inevitable delay of a project completion if costly and invasive reworks were required to obtain it.

The FMI report states:

  • 82% of professionals are collecting more data from construction technology today than three years ago, but 39% say that less than half of that data is usable
  • 40% of the average organisation’s data is bad – meaning inaccurate, incomplete, inconsistent or untimely information
  • Professionals report problems with the whole process, from knowing what data to collect (51%) to understanding how to manage project data effectively (52%)

With such widespread problems, clarity must be a priority when dealing with project data.

What is needed?

When is it needed by?

Who is collecting the data?

Where does the data go and where is it stored?

Why is this data being collected?

And how can the data be easily shared with key stakeholders and collaborated on?

By answering these questions, those in the construction sector can make better decisions to build better, avoiding costly rework and easily complying with mandatory regulations like Part L, and the Building Safety Act. And by integrating the RIGHT solution, these questions will be answered, as a tool built for these demands will be pre-configured to prioritise and standardise structured data.

Which also means that mandatory requirements in regulations such as Part L will no longer be an obstacle. Instead, it will simply be another milestone in a project.

 

Comply with Quality Management

Part L, as an example, demands that SAP assessors have evidence and data presented promptly, so EPCs (Energy Performance Certificates) and the BREL Report (Building Regulation England Part L Report) can be released.  The as-built BREL Report must be completed and presented to the SAP assessor prior to the EPC being produced. An on-site audit of building details and thermal elements will be required during construction and at completion for building regulation approval, including photographic evidence to confirm all new builds and refurbished dwellings are constructed correctly using materials and technology that ensure energy savings and meets building regulation standards.

A centralised platform that collates, standardises, stores and shares all documentation and data, would make Part L a simpler part of the building project process, as opposed to a major obstacle.

Even though construction professionals are collecting more data digitally than ever before, there are plenty that are using the wrong tools for the job. Ambiguous software and platforms that don’t standardise or structure data and don’t offer the required level of quality management mean that any data can slip through the net. Some projects are using a multitude of solutions that synchronise, rendering data and documentation unclear, in silos and even worse – incorrect.

Massive delays can be a symptom of bad data quality management.

 

Get the data seal of approval with the right Quality Management

A clear process, outlined from the beginning and with all stakeholders involved with data acquisition, is key to ensuring any data that is collected, is valuable and understandable.

Templates and guidelines that highlight common standardisations to ensure the right data is gathered, direct where the data should be stored and make the data transparent with a user-friendly experience, accessibility and labelling of data, would help teams align and increase efficiency. Is there a better way to focus your team’s efforts on productive activity, increase efficiency and work toward a swift and satisfactory conclusion, than with a platform where everyone has the data they need at all times and know what they need to do with it?

Erroneous and badly aligned data slow down progress and can make regulatory compliance – something your project depends on – a slog, rather than simply another well-signposted milestone in your process.

A Quality Management solution gives you and your team the templates, workflows and dashboards to capture, mark-up, trace and share all photographic evidence and present it for assessors. It avoids confusion on what data to collect and helps every stakeholder know what needs to be done at every stage. You’re missing photographic evidence for a plot or there is documentation missing? An intuitive and clear dashboard that tracks Part L evidence progress fits the bill and dispels any confusion.

If you want your data to be correct and your project to have that assurance of Quality Management?

Then choose the right tool for the job.

Learn more about our Quality Management Solutions

 

4 Nov 2022 | Blog

Zutec launches new interface across its platform to enhance the experience of its users and increasing useability

Poor decisions made using ‘bad data’ cost the construction industry £1.3 trillion globally in 2020,

These bytes of data that are at the root of this expensive problem, run up rework bills of £63million alone, according to the same report

These staggering numbers scream that more emphasis needs to be focused on collecting and surfacing accurate data and efficient data handling at all stages of the building project.

A sector-specific Quality Management tool that weeds out these expensive errors could generate mammoth cost savings and increase data efficiency across the board for housebuilders, developers and other construction professionals – which would make a positive impact on yearly targets for any housebuilder or developer.

 

What’s the issue?

Bad data, as the FMI report spells out, is bleeding profits for all construction companies, despite the industry converting to more digital methods to manage and understand it.

The report, a survey of 1,115 construction professionals, tells us that there isn’t a specific part of building projects that needs rewriting. Across the board, the data being obtained is either unclear or unusable. At worst, professionals remain unclear about exactly what type of data that needs to be obtained, and how it should be stored and managed. For building regulations like Part L, where digital data is mandatory to ensure compliance, lacking or bad data would lead to the inevitable delay of a project completion if costly and invasive reworks were required to obtain it.

The FMI report states:

  • 82% of professionals are collecting more data from construction technology today than three years ago, but 39% say that less than half of that data is usable
  • 40% of the average organisation’s data is bad – meaning inaccurate, incomplete, inconsistent or untimely information
  • Professionals report problems with the whole process, from knowing what data to collect (51%) to understanding how to manage project data effectively (52%)

With such widespread problems, clarity must be a priority when dealing with project data.

What is needed?

When is it needed by?

Who is collecting the data?

Where does the data go and where is it stored?

Why is this data being collected?

And how can the data be easily shared with key stakeholders and collaborated on?

By answering these questions, those in the construction sector can make better decisions to build better, avoiding costly rework and easily complying with mandatory regulations like Part L, and the Building Safety Act. And by integrating the RIGHT solution, these questions will be answered, as a tool built for these demands will be pre-configured to prioritise and standardise structured data.

Which also means that mandatory requirements in regulations such as Part L will no longer be an obstacle. Instead, it will simply be another milestone in a project.

 

Comply with Quality Management

Part L, as an example, demands that SAP assessors have evidence and data presented promptly, so EPCs (Energy Performance Certificates) and the BREL Report (Building Regulation England Part L Report) can be released.  The as-built BREL Report must be completed and presented to the SAP assessor prior to the EPC being produced. An on-site audit of building details and thermal elements will be required during construction and at completion for building regulation approval, including photographic evidence to confirm all new builds and refurbished dwellings are constructed correctly using materials and technology that ensure energy savings and meets building regulation standards.

A centralised platform that collates, standardises, stores and shares all documentation and data, would make Part L a simpler part of the building project process, as opposed to a major obstacle.

Even though construction professionals are collecting more data digitally than ever before, there are plenty that are using the wrong tools for the job. Ambiguous software and platforms that don’t standardise or structure data and don’t offer the required level of quality management mean that any data can slip through the net. Some projects are using a multitude of solutions that synchronise, rendering data and documentation unclear, in silos and even worse – incorrect.

Massive delays can be a symptom of bad data quality management.

 

Get the data seal of approval with the right Quality Management

A clear process, outlined from the beginning and with all stakeholders involved with data acquisition, is key to ensuring any data that is collected, is valuable and understandable.

Templates and guidelines that highlight common standardisations to ensure the right data is gathered, direct where the data should be stored and make the data transparent with a user-friendly experience, accessibility and labelling of data, would help teams align and increase efficiency. Is there a better way to focus your team’s efforts on productive activity, increase efficiency and work toward a swift and satisfactory conclusion, than with a platform where everyone has the data they need at all times and know what they need to do with it?

Erroneous and badly aligned data slow down progress and can make regulatory compliance – something your project depends on – a slog, rather than simply another well-signposted milestone in your process.

A Quality Management solution gives you and your team the templates, workflows and dashboards to capture, mark-up, trace and share all photographic evidence and present it for assessors. It avoids confusion on what data to collect and helps every stakeholder know what needs to be done at every stage. You’re missing photographic evidence for a plot or there is documentation missing? An intuitive and clear dashboard that tracks Part L evidence progress fits the bill and dispels any confusion.

If you want your data to be correct and your project to have that assurance of Quality Management?

Then choose the right tool for the job.

Learn more about our Quality Management Solutions

 

25 Oct 2022 | Blog

Part L compliance – A tailored platform gives you the right tools for the job

Poor decisions made using ‘bad data’ cost the construction industry £1.3 trillion globally in 2020,

These bytes of data that are at the root of this expensive problem, run up rework bills of £63million alone, according to the same report

These staggering numbers scream that more emphasis needs to be focused on collecting and surfacing accurate data and efficient data handling at all stages of the building project.

A sector-specific Quality Management tool that weeds out these expensive errors could generate mammoth cost savings and increase data efficiency across the board for housebuilders, developers and other construction professionals – which would make a positive impact on yearly targets for any housebuilder or developer.

 

What’s the issue?

Bad data, as the FMI report spells out, is bleeding profits for all construction companies, despite the industry converting to more digital methods to manage and understand it.

The report, a survey of 1,115 construction professionals, tells us that there isn’t a specific part of building projects that needs rewriting. Across the board, the data being obtained is either unclear or unusable. At worst, professionals remain unclear about exactly what type of data that needs to be obtained, and how it should be stored and managed. For building regulations like Part L, where digital data is mandatory to ensure compliance, lacking or bad data would lead to the inevitable delay of a project completion if costly and invasive reworks were required to obtain it.

The FMI report states:

  • 82% of professionals are collecting more data from construction technology today than three years ago, but 39% say that less than half of that data is usable
  • 40% of the average organisation’s data is bad – meaning inaccurate, incomplete, inconsistent or untimely information
  • Professionals report problems with the whole process, from knowing what data to collect (51%) to understanding how to manage project data effectively (52%)

With such widespread problems, clarity must be a priority when dealing with project data.

What is needed?

When is it needed by?

Who is collecting the data?

Where does the data go and where is it stored?

Why is this data being collected?

And how can the data be easily shared with key stakeholders and collaborated on?

By answering these questions, those in the construction sector can make better decisions to build better, avoiding costly rework and easily complying with mandatory regulations like Part L, and the Building Safety Act. And by integrating the RIGHT solution, these questions will be answered, as a tool built for these demands will be pre-configured to prioritise and standardise structured data.

Which also means that mandatory requirements in regulations such as Part L will no longer be an obstacle. Instead, it will simply be another milestone in a project.

 

Comply with Quality Management

Part L, as an example, demands that SAP assessors have evidence and data presented promptly, so EPCs (Energy Performance Certificates) and the BREL Report (Building Regulation England Part L Report) can be released.  The as-built BREL Report must be completed and presented to the SAP assessor prior to the EPC being produced. An on-site audit of building details and thermal elements will be required during construction and at completion for building regulation approval, including photographic evidence to confirm all new builds and refurbished dwellings are constructed correctly using materials and technology that ensure energy savings and meets building regulation standards.

A centralised platform that collates, standardises, stores and shares all documentation and data, would make Part L a simpler part of the building project process, as opposed to a major obstacle.

Even though construction professionals are collecting more data digitally than ever before, there are plenty that are using the wrong tools for the job. Ambiguous software and platforms that don’t standardise or structure data and don’t offer the required level of quality management mean that any data can slip through the net. Some projects are using a multitude of solutions that synchronise, rendering data and documentation unclear, in silos and even worse – incorrect.

Massive delays can be a symptom of bad data quality management.

 

Get the data seal of approval with the right Quality Management

A clear process, outlined from the beginning and with all stakeholders involved with data acquisition, is key to ensuring any data that is collected, is valuable and understandable.

Templates and guidelines that highlight common standardisations to ensure the right data is gathered, direct where the data should be stored and make the data transparent with a user-friendly experience, accessibility and labelling of data, would help teams align and increase efficiency. Is there a better way to focus your team’s efforts on productive activity, increase efficiency and work toward a swift and satisfactory conclusion, than with a platform where everyone has the data they need at all times and know what they need to do with it?

Erroneous and badly aligned data slow down progress and can make regulatory compliance – something your project depends on – a slog, rather than simply another well-signposted milestone in your process.

A Quality Management solution gives you and your team the templates, workflows and dashboards to capture, mark-up, trace and share all photographic evidence and present it for assessors. It avoids confusion on what data to collect and helps every stakeholder know what needs to be done at every stage. You’re missing photographic evidence for a plot or there is documentation missing? An intuitive and clear dashboard that tracks Part L evidence progress fits the bill and dispels any confusion.

If you want your data to be correct and your project to have that assurance of Quality Management?

Then choose the right tool for the job.

Learn more about our Quality Management Solutions

 

20 Sep 2022 | Blog

Part L – All Questions Answered

Poor decisions made using ‘bad data’ cost the construction industry £1.3 trillion globally in 2020,

These bytes of data that are at the root of this expensive problem, run up rework bills of £63million alone, according to the same report

These staggering numbers scream that more emphasis needs to be focused on collecting and surfacing accurate data and efficient data handling at all stages of the building project.

A sector-specific Quality Management tool that weeds out these expensive errors could generate mammoth cost savings and increase data efficiency across the board for housebuilders, developers and other construction professionals – which would make a positive impact on yearly targets for any housebuilder or developer.

 

What’s the issue?

Bad data, as the FMI report spells out, is bleeding profits for all construction companies, despite the industry converting to more digital methods to manage and understand it.

The report, a survey of 1,115 construction professionals, tells us that there isn’t a specific part of building projects that needs rewriting. Across the board, the data being obtained is either unclear or unusable. At worst, professionals remain unclear about exactly what type of data that needs to be obtained, and how it should be stored and managed. For building regulations like Part L, where digital data is mandatory to ensure compliance, lacking or bad data would lead to the inevitable delay of a project completion if costly and invasive reworks were required to obtain it.

The FMI report states:

  • 82% of professionals are collecting more data from construction technology today than three years ago, but 39% say that less than half of that data is usable
  • 40% of the average organisation’s data is bad – meaning inaccurate, incomplete, inconsistent or untimely information
  • Professionals report problems with the whole process, from knowing what data to collect (51%) to understanding how to manage project data effectively (52%)

With such widespread problems, clarity must be a priority when dealing with project data.

What is needed?

When is it needed by?

Who is collecting the data?

Where does the data go and where is it stored?

Why is this data being collected?

And how can the data be easily shared with key stakeholders and collaborated on?

By answering these questions, those in the construction sector can make better decisions to build better, avoiding costly rework and easily complying with mandatory regulations like Part L, and the Building Safety Act. And by integrating the RIGHT solution, these questions will be answered, as a tool built for these demands will be pre-configured to prioritise and standardise structured data.

Which also means that mandatory requirements in regulations such as Part L will no longer be an obstacle. Instead, it will simply be another milestone in a project.

 

Comply with Quality Management

Part L, as an example, demands that SAP assessors have evidence and data presented promptly, so EPCs (Energy Performance Certificates) and the BREL Report (Building Regulation England Part L Report) can be released.  The as-built BREL Report must be completed and presented to the SAP assessor prior to the EPC being produced. An on-site audit of building details and thermal elements will be required during construction and at completion for building regulation approval, including photographic evidence to confirm all new builds and refurbished dwellings are constructed correctly using materials and technology that ensure energy savings and meets building regulation standards.

A centralised platform that collates, standardises, stores and shares all documentation and data, would make Part L a simpler part of the building project process, as opposed to a major obstacle.

Even though construction professionals are collecting more data digitally than ever before, there are plenty that are using the wrong tools for the job. Ambiguous software and platforms that don’t standardise or structure data and don’t offer the required level of quality management mean that any data can slip through the net. Some projects are using a multitude of solutions that synchronise, rendering data and documentation unclear, in silos and even worse – incorrect.

Massive delays can be a symptom of bad data quality management.

 

Get the data seal of approval with the right Quality Management

A clear process, outlined from the beginning and with all stakeholders involved with data acquisition, is key to ensuring any data that is collected, is valuable and understandable.

Templates and guidelines that highlight common standardisations to ensure the right data is gathered, direct where the data should be stored and make the data transparent with a user-friendly experience, accessibility and labelling of data, would help teams align and increase efficiency. Is there a better way to focus your team’s efforts on productive activity, increase efficiency and work toward a swift and satisfactory conclusion, than with a platform where everyone has the data they need at all times and know what they need to do with it?

Erroneous and badly aligned data slow down progress and can make regulatory compliance – something your project depends on – a slog, rather than simply another well-signposted milestone in your process.

A Quality Management solution gives you and your team the templates, workflows and dashboards to capture, mark-up, trace and share all photographic evidence and present it for assessors. It avoids confusion on what data to collect and helps every stakeholder know what needs to be done at every stage. You’re missing photographic evidence for a plot or there is documentation missing? An intuitive and clear dashboard that tracks Part L evidence progress fits the bill and dispels any confusion.

If you want your data to be correct and your project to have that assurance of Quality Management?

Then choose the right tool for the job.

Learn more about our Quality Management Solutions

 

1 Sep 2022 | Blog

Cladding Remediation: EWS1 Form Facts

Poor decisions made using ‘bad data’ cost the construction industry £1.3 trillion globally in 2020,

These bytes of data that are at the root of this expensive problem, run up rework bills of £63million alone, according to the same report

These staggering numbers scream that more emphasis needs to be focused on collecting and surfacing accurate data and efficient data handling at all stages of the building project.

A sector-specific Quality Management tool that weeds out these expensive errors could generate mammoth cost savings and increase data efficiency across the board for housebuilders, developers and other construction professionals – which would make a positive impact on yearly targets for any housebuilder or developer.

 

What’s the issue?

Bad data, as the FMI report spells out, is bleeding profits for all construction companies, despite the industry converting to more digital methods to manage and understand it.

The report, a survey of 1,115 construction professionals, tells us that there isn’t a specific part of building projects that needs rewriting. Across the board, the data being obtained is either unclear or unusable. At worst, professionals remain unclear about exactly what type of data that needs to be obtained, and how it should be stored and managed. For building regulations like Part L, where digital data is mandatory to ensure compliance, lacking or bad data would lead to the inevitable delay of a project completion if costly and invasive reworks were required to obtain it.

The FMI report states:

  • 82% of professionals are collecting more data from construction technology today than three years ago, but 39% say that less than half of that data is usable
  • 40% of the average organisation’s data is bad – meaning inaccurate, incomplete, inconsistent or untimely information
  • Professionals report problems with the whole process, from knowing what data to collect (51%) to understanding how to manage project data effectively (52%)

With such widespread problems, clarity must be a priority when dealing with project data.

What is needed?

When is it needed by?

Who is collecting the data?

Where does the data go and where is it stored?

Why is this data being collected?

And how can the data be easily shared with key stakeholders and collaborated on?

By answering these questions, those in the construction sector can make better decisions to build better, avoiding costly rework and easily complying with mandatory regulations like Part L, and the Building Safety Act. And by integrating the RIGHT solution, these questions will be answered, as a tool built for these demands will be pre-configured to prioritise and standardise structured data.

Which also means that mandatory requirements in regulations such as Part L will no longer be an obstacle. Instead, it will simply be another milestone in a project.

 

Comply with Quality Management

Part L, as an example, demands that SAP assessors have evidence and data presented promptly, so EPCs (Energy Performance Certificates) and the BREL Report (Building Regulation England Part L Report) can be released.  The as-built BREL Report must be completed and presented to the SAP assessor prior to the EPC being produced. An on-site audit of building details and thermal elements will be required during construction and at completion for building regulation approval, including photographic evidence to confirm all new builds and refurbished dwellings are constructed correctly using materials and technology that ensure energy savings and meets building regulation standards.

A centralised platform that collates, standardises, stores and shares all documentation and data, would make Part L a simpler part of the building project process, as opposed to a major obstacle.

Even though construction professionals are collecting more data digitally than ever before, there are plenty that are using the wrong tools for the job. Ambiguous software and platforms that don’t standardise or structure data and don’t offer the required level of quality management mean that any data can slip through the net. Some projects are using a multitude of solutions that synchronise, rendering data and documentation unclear, in silos and even worse – incorrect.

Massive delays can be a symptom of bad data quality management.

 

Get the data seal of approval with the right Quality Management

A clear process, outlined from the beginning and with all stakeholders involved with data acquisition, is key to ensuring any data that is collected, is valuable and understandable.

Templates and guidelines that highlight common standardisations to ensure the right data is gathered, direct where the data should be stored and make the data transparent with a user-friendly experience, accessibility and labelling of data, would help teams align and increase efficiency. Is there a better way to focus your team’s efforts on productive activity, increase efficiency and work toward a swift and satisfactory conclusion, than with a platform where everyone has the data they need at all times and know what they need to do with it?

Erroneous and badly aligned data slow down progress and can make regulatory compliance – something your project depends on – a slog, rather than simply another well-signposted milestone in your process.

A Quality Management solution gives you and your team the templates, workflows and dashboards to capture, mark-up, trace and share all photographic evidence and present it for assessors. It avoids confusion on what data to collect and helps every stakeholder know what needs to be done at every stage. You’re missing photographic evidence for a plot or there is documentation missing? An intuitive and clear dashboard that tracks Part L evidence progress fits the bill and dispels any confusion.

If you want your data to be correct and your project to have that assurance of Quality Management?

Then choose the right tool for the job.

Learn more about our Quality Management Solutions

 

23 Aug 2022 | Blog

Why Construction Saas can help simplify cladding remediation

Poor decisions made using ‘bad data’ cost the construction industry £1.3 trillion globally in 2020,

These bytes of data that are at the root of this expensive problem, run up rework bills of £63million alone, according to the same report

These staggering numbers scream that more emphasis needs to be focused on collecting and surfacing accurate data and efficient data handling at all stages of the building project.

A sector-specific Quality Management tool that weeds out these expensive errors could generate mammoth cost savings and increase data efficiency across the board for housebuilders, developers and other construction professionals – which would make a positive impact on yearly targets for any housebuilder or developer.

 

What’s the issue?

Bad data, as the FMI report spells out, is bleeding profits for all construction companies, despite the industry converting to more digital methods to manage and understand it.

The report, a survey of 1,115 construction professionals, tells us that there isn’t a specific part of building projects that needs rewriting. Across the board, the data being obtained is either unclear or unusable. At worst, professionals remain unclear about exactly what type of data that needs to be obtained, and how it should be stored and managed. For building regulations like Part L, where digital data is mandatory to ensure compliance, lacking or bad data would lead to the inevitable delay of a project completion if costly and invasive reworks were required to obtain it.

The FMI report states:

  • 82% of professionals are collecting more data from construction technology today than three years ago, but 39% say that less than half of that data is usable
  • 40% of the average organisation’s data is bad – meaning inaccurate, incomplete, inconsistent or untimely information
  • Professionals report problems with the whole process, from knowing what data to collect (51%) to understanding how to manage project data effectively (52%)

With such widespread problems, clarity must be a priority when dealing with project data.

What is needed?

When is it needed by?

Who is collecting the data?

Where does the data go and where is it stored?

Why is this data being collected?

And how can the data be easily shared with key stakeholders and collaborated on?

By answering these questions, those in the construction sector can make better decisions to build better, avoiding costly rework and easily complying with mandatory regulations like Part L, and the Building Safety Act. And by integrating the RIGHT solution, these questions will be answered, as a tool built for these demands will be pre-configured to prioritise and standardise structured data.

Which also means that mandatory requirements in regulations such as Part L will no longer be an obstacle. Instead, it will simply be another milestone in a project.

 

Comply with Quality Management

Part L, as an example, demands that SAP assessors have evidence and data presented promptly, so EPCs (Energy Performance Certificates) and the BREL Report (Building Regulation England Part L Report) can be released.  The as-built BREL Report must be completed and presented to the SAP assessor prior to the EPC being produced. An on-site audit of building details and thermal elements will be required during construction and at completion for building regulation approval, including photographic evidence to confirm all new builds and refurbished dwellings are constructed correctly using materials and technology that ensure energy savings and meets building regulation standards.

A centralised platform that collates, standardises, stores and shares all documentation and data, would make Part L a simpler part of the building project process, as opposed to a major obstacle.

Even though construction professionals are collecting more data digitally than ever before, there are plenty that are using the wrong tools for the job. Ambiguous software and platforms that don’t standardise or structure data and don’t offer the required level of quality management mean that any data can slip through the net. Some projects are using a multitude of solutions that synchronise, rendering data and documentation unclear, in silos and even worse – incorrect.

Massive delays can be a symptom of bad data quality management.

 

Get the data seal of approval with the right Quality Management

A clear process, outlined from the beginning and with all stakeholders involved with data acquisition, is key to ensuring any data that is collected, is valuable and understandable.

Templates and guidelines that highlight common standardisations to ensure the right data is gathered, direct where the data should be stored and make the data transparent with a user-friendly experience, accessibility and labelling of data, would help teams align and increase efficiency. Is there a better way to focus your team’s efforts on productive activity, increase efficiency and work toward a swift and satisfactory conclusion, than with a platform where everyone has the data they need at all times and know what they need to do with it?

Erroneous and badly aligned data slow down progress and can make regulatory compliance – something your project depends on – a slog, rather than simply another well-signposted milestone in your process.

A Quality Management solution gives you and your team the templates, workflows and dashboards to capture, mark-up, trace and share all photographic evidence and present it for assessors. It avoids confusion on what data to collect and helps every stakeholder know what needs to be done at every stage. You’re missing photographic evidence for a plot or there is documentation missing? An intuitive and clear dashboard that tracks Part L evidence progress fits the bill and dispels any confusion.

If you want your data to be correct and your project to have that assurance of Quality Management?

Then choose the right tool for the job.

Learn more about our Quality Management Solutions

 

11 Apr 2022 | Blog

Zutec announces landmark partnership with VBIS

We are delighted to announce our partnership with Australia’s Virtual Buildings Information System (VBIS).

A landmark collaboration, the coming together of Zutec and the VBIS Standard enables the seamless, efficient and accurate compilation of facility asset information, through an industry standard asset classification system.
Specifically, this enhancement helps to link data in disparate systems, within the existing built environment to provide a whole-life view of the assets.

An integral part of the recently launched Victoria Digital Asset Strategy (VDAS), VBIS is intentionally designed to facilitate the standardisation of asset categorisation and accessing information. It’s a crucial tool in driving up quality through the asset lifecycle, as well as de-risking the building and increasing compliance.

VBIS’ asset and documentation classification structure, combined with its search syntax, facilitates the efficient transfer of useful information from contractors to facilities and asset managers.
Importantly, this combined approach will provide facilities and asset managers with a consistent way to search, display, compare and interrogate key asset and maintenance information.

Commenting on the partnership, Charles Walker, Regional project lead at Zutec, says, “Becoming VBIS enabled allows for a greater level of interconnectivity and ensures our customers can easily locate their information, which, with large, complex facilities in particular, can be a long and arduous process. We are also continually looking for ways to get involved with government-backed initiatives around the world to take our platform to the next level and to provide our users with the best construction and asset data technology available.

“As we help the industry to become increasingly digitised, an ontology for assets in the built environment will prove crucial, and will make the entire construction process, from the design phase through to handover, simpler and more successful overall.”
To date, Zutec is already being adopted across some VBIS-enabled projects in Victoria. The platform-provider will continue to work in close partnership with VBIS, helping improve efficiency, accuracy, consistency and transparency in the construction journey, at handover and in the ongoing facilities management.

Significantly, it empowers the built industry to have safer, more comfortable and higher quality properties.

For more information about Virtual Buildings Information System (VBIS), click here.

10 Dec 2021 | Blog / Insights

Digital Construction Week 2021 – Round Up

There was certainly a buzz in the air at this year’s Digital Construction Week 2021. After a difficult 18 months, 125 exhibitors came together at ExCeL London showcasing the latest technological advancements in the industry that will no doubt continue to shape the construction industry for years to come.

If you didn’t get the opportunity to attend this year event. Here is a quick round up from our speakers.

 

Digital Construction on Europe’s Biggest Project
Speakers: Ray Mc Caul, Project Manager, Zutec and Dr. Anita Soni, Deputy Head of BIM, Skanska

 

Dr Anita Soni, Deputy Head of BIM, Skanska

Zutec’s Ray McCaul was joined by Dr Anita Soni, Deputy head of BIM, Skanska in a very special session to share lessons from phase 1 of the HS2 project. Uncovering key findings and showcasing the collaborative approach which was adopted between SCS and Zutec to configure a platform suitable for the unique requirements of the project.

Dr Anita Soni explained the benefits of using Zutec for the HS2 project. “Zutec gave us better visibility of quality issue trends through real-time reporting, the system is already ensuring success, right-first-time and customer satisfaction.”

Ray also commented on the collaboration “It has improved performance and efficiencies through streamlining site inspections with automated workflows, notifications and PIN-secured signatures in a common data environment (CDE). Zutec enables us to package the final handover documentation almost instantly and provides an ideal environment for designers, engineers, architects and suppliers to input into our digital twin.”

The audience where then shown a short video of Zutec in action followed by Dr. Anita Soni sharing the key learnings :

BIM connection and set up was really easy

Project management
• BIM- Zutec weekly drop in session
• Forward thinking plan to pre- empty what could happen before it was fully agreed
• Open communication between Zutec and BIM
• Test/Pilot and trials put in place to ensure integration works
• Agreed at project inception that data was going to be structured based on assets
• Pragmatic approach to defining data structure, didn’t go to n’th degree. Able to deliver quicker as result
• A defined plan was put in place and followed through.

Users engagement
• Use a variety of channels to brief users on how the data was going to be structured on assets
• Engage SME at revision, e.g. NCR form revised 6 times circa with users
• Engaged the right people, not everyone. Had discussions and then executed
• Quality/Technical assurance teams are advocates of solution and key in pushing adoption

Vendor
• Brain storming sessions to answer queries and provide feedback to SCS on what it was possible
• Engaged at the start of the project, normally further down the line with poor data already in place
• Collaboration in Zutec, came across as clearly understanding and most prepared
• During solution option selection it was evident Zutec was the most prepared and aligned with SCS
• Embedded team members (project manager, developer) with SCS BIM to aid collaboration.
• Senior managers involved during the trial. Having access to CTO was very helpful to bring vision to life.
• Project manager knows construction so able to have ‘intelligent’ conversation with site engineers

Data
• Data structure set up in advance and based on assets
• Data in SQL database from start (not usual in construction)
• All data structure is standardized, making it simple to connect and work with
• Structured Data around assets
• Getting data Structure right at the start was key
Documentation
• Screen views to showcase how things worked (light)
• Document output of the brainstorming to show what if was possible (Zutec)

Technical / IT
• BIM team has control of the data where eg AssetWise is through third party vendor so challenge in relationships
• API was easy to set up (set up over the weekend) and it still works. Only one connector rather than multiple as in Assetwise
• Clear requirements from the start that allowed identification of what development was needed

Training
• Training with all relevant stakeholders
• Easy to train as only one solution
• Having specialist product owner (Zutec) was key in developing and implement training

 

Putting People at The Heart of Your Digital Transformation
Speaker: Emily Hopson- Hill, COO, Zutec

 

Emily Hopson-Hill, COO, Zutec

Emily Hospson-Hill, shared her extensive knowledge and expertise of digital transformation implementation at this years DCW. Talking through common reasons why digital transformation stalls or even fails she took the audience on a journey through change in the industry that’s making digital transformation increasing necessary and prevalent.

Emily put forward how to approach high level stakeholders to get them onboard with digitization and how to get your champions buy-in. Speaking then about adaption Emily said: “You need to plan time and activities and measure success on both. And remember that no plan survives contact with the enemy or as Mike Tyson put it ’everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth’.”

Rounding off her speakers session Emily left the audience with this summary – “Technology is there to ensure we’re all speaking the same language, with the same amount of detail.”

 

Digital Management Software—Open Workshop
Speaker: Jeslin Joy, Head of Sales Engineering, Zutec
Host: Rahul Shah, Sector Development Director, BSI

 

Jeslin Joy DCW 2021

Host Rahul Shah, BSI opened the session with a discussion around how the BSI kitemark certification helps to align software to the highest usability standards and provides guidance on both robust and resilient BIM Developments.

Asked about the future of construction within the built environment Jeslin emphasised how data plays an important role in shaping the processes used within construction. Enabling transparency and helping companies achieve compliance on their projects.

Lastly, Jeslin highlighted the importance of the BSI Kitemark he pointed out the importance it has for building trust in the construction industry between customers and vendors and insuring a high standard of quality in SaaS platforms inline with best practices.

 

Didn’t get a chance to catch up with us at Digital Construction Week? No worries, if you would like to find out more about Zutec, you can talk to one of our consultants by booking a demo here.

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